Jeffrey L. Tedder

Patient Info

Healthcare

  • Four weeks of riding an e-bike promotes fitness and health

    Source: Science Daily

    The role of the e-bike in promoting health and fitness is comparable to that of a conventional bicycle. In particular, overweight and untrained individuals can benefit from riding an e-bike.

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  • Prolonged opioid use before knee or hip replacement surgery increases risk of poor outcomes

    Source: Medical Xpress

    Patients who take prescription opioids for more than 60 days before total knee or hip replacement surgery are at significantly higher risk of being readmitted to the hospital and of undergoing repeat joint-replacement surgery, compared to patients with no preoperative opioid use, reports a study in the July 18 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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  • Young athletes with shoulder instability might benefit from arthroscopy

    Source: EurekAlert

    Young athletes with shoulder instability are considered to be a high-risk group of patients following arthroscopic shoulder stabilization given the high recurrence rates and lower rates of return to sport, which have been reported in the literature. However, according to researchers presenting their work today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Annual Meeting in San Diego outcomes may be improved by proper patient selection and reserving arthroscopic stabilization for athletes with fewer incidents of pre-operative instability.

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  • When it comes to weight loss in overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis, more is better

    Source: Medical Xpress

    Researchers previously showed that overweight and obese individuals with knee osteoarthritis can reduce pain by 50% and significantly improve function and mobility with a 10% or more weight loss over an 18-month period. The investigators' latest findings, which are published in Arthritis Care & Research, reveal that a 20% or more weight loss has the added benefit of continued improvement in physical health-related quality of life along with an additional 25% reduction in pain and improvement in function.

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  • For high school baseball pitchers, extra throws on game day add up but go uncounted

    Source: Science Daily

    For high school baseball pitchers, limiting throws during a game helps to prevent fatigue and injuries. But nearly half the number of pitches -- ones thrown during warm-ups and in the bullpen -- are typically not counted, adding significantly to a pitcher's risk of injury, new findings show.

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  • Better implants key to repair damaged knees

    Source: Medical Xpress

    People whose knees have been affected by osteoarthritis, also known as the 'wear and tear' arthritis, often have to get knee implants to repair the damage. But if a knee implant does not fit the specific individual, it can lead to soft tissue damage, collapsing of the underlying bone, loosening of the implant and an increased likelihood of joint pain after an operation.

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  • When Can I Return to Play After an Orthopedic Sports Injury?

    Source: US News

    Recovery is as unique to the individual as is their genetic makeup – it really does depend on a wide variety of factors. However, for many common orthopedic injuries, there's usually a fairly consistent timeline for return to sport or active living.

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  • Health Tip: What To Expect From Joint Replacement Surgery

    Source: Health Day

    Joint replacement surgery removes damaged parts of a joint and replaces them with man-made parts. The goal is to restore function and reduce pain and inflammation.

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  • What causes knee buckling?

    Source: Medical News Today

    Knee buckling can be a sign of injury or damage to the knee. It can increase the risk of falling and can prolong recovery from knee problems.

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  • MACI Makes New Knees

    Source: Ivanhoe

    People who severely damage cartilage in their knees have a new treatment option that uses their own cells. MACI, or matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation is the first FDA approved product that actually grows a patient’s own cells on scaffolds, to be re-implanted.

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